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Thread: updates on live kali in persistence mode?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
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    updates on live kali in persistence mode?

    Hi,

    I hold a live usb with kali linux x64, I boot it in persistence mode, I read that I can save something in the usb key by using this modality: could I also save system updates then?
    (I often use this live distro to surf on the internet and my problem is that I would also like to have an OS less vulnerable as possible...)

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
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    8
    While it is possible, it is not recommended from what I have read. While you can technically run a system update in the live session to upgrade it to the latest version, there is a high chance that it might break the system because of a conflict in kernel, and the bootloader is not configured to make use of the new updated kernel.

    But if you are looking for a "less vulnerable OS" I would advise against a live usb. When you boot up a live USB, it boots directly to the desktop. There is no login or any security mechanism to protect anyone from accessing your data. You could just follow the instructions to install to a harddisk and pick your usb as install location instead

  3. #3
    Join Date
    2015-Jul
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    Quote Originally Posted by roberta lrp View Post
    (I often use this live distro to surf on the internet and my problem is that I would also like to have an OS less vulnerable as possible...)
    use Tails. It is very secure (in my opinion the most) for surfing, but they only have x86 version (which is run on x64 system)
    you can also install it.
    https://tails.boum.org/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezstyles View Post
    While it is possible, it is not recommended from what I have read. While you can technically run a system update in the live session to upgrade it to the latest version, there is a high chance that it might break the system because of a conflict in kernel, and the bootloader is not configured to make use of the new updated kernel.

    But if you are looking for a "less vulnerable OS" I would advise against a live usb. When you boot up a live USB, it boots directly to the desktop. There is no login or any security mechanism to protect anyone from accessing your data. You could just follow the instructions to install to a harddisk and pick your usb as install location instead
    Thank you for the advise.
    I have already installed kali Linux on my second internal hard disk actually, I just wanted to run the live kali because of the totally absence of possibilities to have a virus inside and I need to use internet banking for money transferring as well...
    I read that an american bank gives a linux live cd to their customers for doing internet banking, so I supposed it was the safer method.
    So do you think I should better use the kali Linux installed instead than a live distro for this purpose?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
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    8
    I can't comment on whether that is a more secure way of banking, I have never heard that or looked into it and I know of no bank that gives live cd's/usb's for their banking transactions. (Note I'd not trust one given to me anyhow. I'd make my own, verifying checksums of the downloads) That's not to say there aren't any that do so or that it's not secure, I am just unaware. I stay away from banks as much as possible.

    If you were worried about someone gaining physical access to your computer and gathering your banking information from it, I'd advise encrypting your system, disabling cookies and javascript and enforcing https, and do not store usernames and/or passwords in whatever browser you choose to use. These are more just deterrents, as with physical access and enough time to a computer, they will get in eventually if they have the know how. But you might as well make it as difficult as possible for them. You could also look into luksnuke, and/or putting your boot partition on a removeable usb, for greater security, though I'm not sure if both these options can work in tandem.

    If you're worried about someone breaking into your system remotely, I'd advise running Tor, which makes you harder to track, comes with HTTPS Everywhere, and No Script by default, and also follow above mentioned tips. There are many ways to enhance your security.

    What I might advise is running an encrypted virtual machine of whatever distro you like with Whonix, inside your already encrypted sytem. There is a youtube tutorial of how to set this up with Kali. Just search Kali Whonix. And google Whonix as well so you know what it is.
    Good luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by duxim View Post
    use Tails. It is very secure (in my opinion the most) for surfing, but they only have x86 version (which is run on x64 system)
    you can also install it.
    https://tails.boum.org/
    Thank you for recommend me Tails, I created a live usb with it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    2015-Oct
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by ezstyles View Post
    I can't comment on whether that is a more secure way of banking, I have never heard that or looked into it and I know of no bank that gives live cd's/usb's for their banking transactions. (Note I'd not trust one given to me anyhow. I'd make my own, verifying checksums of the downloads) That's not to say there aren't any that do so or that it's not secure, I am just unaware. I stay away from banks as much as possible.

    If you were worried about someone gaining physical access to your computer and gathering your banking information from it, I'd advise encrypting your system, disabling cookies and javascript and enforcing https, and do not store usernames and/or passwords in whatever browser you choose to use. These are more just deterrents, as with physical access and enough time to a computer, they will get in eventually if they have the know how. But you might as well make it as difficult as possible for them. You could also look into luksnuke, and/or putting your boot partition on a removeable usb, for greater security, though I'm not sure if both these options can work in tandem.

    If you're worried about someone breaking into your system remotely, I'd advise running Tor, which makes you harder to track, comes with HTTPS Everywhere, and No Script by default, and also follow above mentioned tips. There are many ways to enhance your security.

    What I might advise is running an encrypted virtual machine of whatever distro you like with Whonix, inside your already encrypted sytem. There is a youtube tutorial of how to set this up with Kali. Just search Kali Whonix. And google Whonix as well so you know what it is.
    Good luck
    Do you mean running whonix into kali ? But does whonix go to be more a virtual machine than a very operative system, if I understend the key idea of this project? Is it more likely a safe browser?
    If yes, what about running whonix into Tails? Coul I maybe extend my security level, by using both at the same time?

    Thank you very much.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    2015-Nov
    Posts
    7
    so you can't install for example an nvida driver ?

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